The Ito Sisters Set to Screen in March - NBC Bay Area

The Ito Sisters Set to Screen in March

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    Directed and produced by Antonia Grace Glenn and produced and edited by Gregory Pacificar, THE ITO SISTERS captures the rarely told stories of the experiences of Issei (or Japanese immigrants) and Nisei (or first generation born in the US) women, whose voices have largely been excluded from American history. At the center of the film are three Nisei sisters: Natsuye (Nancy), Haruye (Lillian) and Hideko (Hedy), whose lives were directly impacted by some of the most significant events of 20th-century America, from the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 to the Great Depression to World War II.

    According to Antonia Grace Glenn, “While there have been several important documentary films that explore the WWII incarceration of Japanese Americans, there are few if any films that focus on the Japanese American experience before the war. Today, not many people know that there were segregated schools in Sacramento County to separate white and Asian children; or the central role that Asian laborers played in establishing California’s agricultural wealth; or that arranged marriages were regularly practiced by Japanese Americans in California.”

    The Ito Sisters, a 2017 Berkeley Film Festival favorite, is back in 2018 with three screening dates for this March throughout the Bay Area!

    Directed and produced by Antonia Grace Glenn and produced and edited by Gregory Pacificar, The Ito Sisters captures the rarely told stories of the experiences of Issei (or Japanese immigrants) and Nisei (or first generation born in the US) women, whose voices have largely been excluded from American history.

    At the center of the film are three Nisei sisters: Natsuye (Nancy), Haruye (Lillian) and Hideko (Hedy), whose lives were directly impacted by some of the most significant events of 20th-century America, from the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 to the Great Depression to World War II.

    According to Antonia Grace Glenn, “While there have been several important documentary films that explore the WWII incarceration of Japanese Americans, there are few if any films that focus on the Japanese American experience before the war.

    Today, not many people know that there were segregated schools in Sacramento County to separate white and Asian children; or the central role that Asian laborers played in establishing California’s agricultural wealth; or that arranged marriages were regularly practiced by Japanese Americans in California.”

    Sat. March 10, 2018Thur. March 15, 2018Sat. March 17, 2018
    1:00PM

    7:00PM

    1:00PM

    Japanese American Museum of San Jose - 535 N 1st St, San Jose

    Presidio Officers' Club - 50 Moraga Ave, San FranciscoTillie Lewis Theater - 5151 Pacific Ave, Stockton
    More info: email publicprograms@jamsj.orgMore info: click here More info: email aeko@sbcglobal.net