Fact Check: Skewed Trump, Barr Claims on Mueller Report - NBC Bay Area
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Fact Check: Skewed Trump, Barr Claims on Mueller Report

Trump and his team continue to insist that he was exonerated by the two-year investigation. That's not true

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    NEWSLETTERS

    DOJ Releases Mueller Report

    A redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report into Russian election meddling and President Donald Trump has been released to Congress and the public. (Published Thursday, April 18, 2019)

    President Donald Trump and his attorney general are distorting the facts when it comes to special counsel Robert Mueller's report in the Russia investigation.

    Trump and his team continue to insist that he was exonerated by the two-year investigation. That's not true. The report specifically declines to clear the president on possible charges of obstruction of justice.

    And in remarks Thursday at the Justice Department, Attorney General William Barr suggested he was not really supposed to be publicly releasing the two-volume report but, on the other hand, it was "long-standing" practice to share such types of confidential information with the White House. He's wrong.

    A look at the claims:

    Mueller Report: 10 Instances of Possible Obstruction of Justice by Trump

    [NATL] Mueller Report: 10 Instances of Possible Obstruction of Justice by Trump

    Special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election included instances of potential obstruction by President Donald Trump. Here is a rundown of the ten mentioned in the report.

    (Published Thursday, April 18, 2019)

    TRUMP: "As I have been saying all along, NO COLLUSION - NO OBSTRUCTION!" — tweet Thursday.

    VICE PRESIDENT MIKE PENCE: "Today's release of the Special Counsel's report confirms what the President and I have said since day one: there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia and there was no obstruction of justice."

    KELLYANNE CONWAY, White House counselor: "What matters is what the Department of Justice and special counsel concluded here, which is no collusion, no obstruction, and complete exoneration, as the president says."

    THE FACTS: No. The special counsel specifically leaves open the question of whether the president obstructed justice.

    "If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state. Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, however, we are unable to reach that judgment," the report states.

    The report identifies 10 instances of possible obstruction by Trump and said he might have "had a motive" to impede the investigation because of what it could find on a multitude of personal matters, such as his proposal to build a Trump Tower in Moscow.

    Trump Reiterates ‘No Collusion’ After Release of Mueller Report

    [NATL] Trump Reiterates ‘No Collusion’ After Release of Mueller Report

    President Donald Trump said at a White House event for wounded warriors on Thursday that he’s “having a good day,” following the release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

    (Published Thursday, April 18, 2019)

    "The evidence does indicate that a thorough FBI investigation would uncover facts about the campaign and the President personally that the President could have understood to be crimes or that would give rise to personal and political concerns," the report states.

    In explaining its decision, Mueller's team said reaching a conclusion on whether Trump committed crimes would be inappropriate because of Justice Department guidelines indicating that a sitting president should not be prosecuted. It nevertheless left open at least the theoretical possibility that Trump could be charged after he leaves office, noting that its factual investigation was conducted "in order to preserve the evidence when memories were fresh and documentary material were available."

    "Accordingly, while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him," the report states.

    BARR: "These reports are not supposed to be made public."

    THE FACTS: He's not going out on a limb for public disclosure.

    Justice Department regulations give Barr wide authority to release a special counsel's report in situations it "would be in the public interest." Barr had made clear during his Senate confirmation hearing in January that he believed in transparency with the report on Mueller's investigation into Russian election interference during the 2016 campaign, "consistent with regulations and the law."

    Nadler: Barr Undermined His Own Department to Protect Trump

    [NATL] Nadler: Barr Undermined His Own Department to Protect Trump

    House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-NY, said after the release of the redacted Mueller report that Attorney General William Barr has “shown an unsettling willingness to undermine his own department in order to protect President Trump.”

    (Published Thursday, April 18, 2019)

    BARR, saying it was "consistent with long-standing practice" for him to share a copy of the redacted report with the White House and president's attorneys before its release: "Earlier this week, the president's personal counsel requested and were given the opportunity to read a final version of the redacted report before it was publicly released. That request was consistent with the practice followed under the Ethics in Government Act, which permitted individuals named in a report prepared by an independent counsel the opportunity to read the report before publication."

    THE FACTS: Actually, Barr's decision, citing the Ethics in Government Act, is inconsistent with independent counsel Ken Starr's handling of his report into whether President Bill Clinton obstructed and lied in Starr's probe.

    On Sept. 7, 1998, Clinton's attorney David Kendall requested that Starr provide him an opportunity to review the report before it was sent to Congress. Starr quickly turned him down.

    "As a matter of legal interpretation, I respectfully disagree with your analysis," Starr wrote to Kendall two days later. Starr called Kendall "mistaken" regarding the rights of the president's attorneys to "review a 'report' before it is transmitted to Congress."

    Starr's report was governed by the ethics act cited by Barr as his justification for showing the report to the president's team. It has since expired. Current regulations governing Mueller's work don't specify how confidential information should be shared with the White House.

    Starr's report led to the impeachment trial of Clinton in 1999.

    Schiff: AG Did 'Grave Disservice' to US

    [NATL] Schiff: AG Did 'Grave Disservice' to US

    House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday that Attorney General William Barr "did a grave disservice to his own country by misrepresenting several parts of the Mueller report."

    (Published Thursday, April 18, 2019)