Constance Wu Slams Matt Damon's Role in 'The Great Wall' as Perpetuating 'Racist Myth' | NBC Bay Area

Constance Wu Slams Matt Damon's Role in 'The Great Wall' as Perpetuating 'Racist Myth'

"Not blaming Damon, the studio, the Chinese financiers. It's not about blame, It's about AWARENESS"

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    VCG via Getty Images
    Matt Damon speaks at a Jul 2, 2015, press event for "The Great Wall" in Beijing.

    Actress Constance Wu spoke out this week about the casting of Matt Damon as the star of a movie about the Great Wall in China, saying it perpetuates the notion that somehow people of color need to be saved by a white man.

    In response to "The Great Wall," in which Damon plays a warrior traversing the massive Chinese fortification, the "Fresh Off the Boat" actress took to Twitter to rail against stereotyping in film.

    "We have to stop perpetuating the racist myth that a only white man can save the world," Wu wrote, adding, "It's not based on actual fact. Our heroes don't look like Matt Damon. They look like Malala. Ghandi (sic). Mandela. Your big sister when she stood up for you to those bullies that one time."

    WATCH: J.J. Abrams Offers Solution to Hollywood's Diversity Issue

    Returning Marine Meets Son For First Time

    [NATL] Returning Marine Meets Son For First Time
    A Tennessee Marine returning from deployment met his newborn son for the first time Thursday. (Published 3 hours ago)

    The 33-year-old went on to point fingers not at the financial institutions funding the film, but a deep-rooted problem underpinning stories involving race.

    "Money is the lamest excuse in the history of being human. So is blaming the Chinese investors," she continued. "Remember it's not about blaming individuals... it's about pointing out the repeatedly implied racist notion that white people are superior to POC (people of color) and that POC need salvation from our own color via white strength."

    Mom Thwarts Attempted Kidnapping

    [NATL-DFW] Mom Thwarts Attempted Kidnapping

    One Albuquerque, New Mexico mother got the shock of a lifetime when she turned around just in time to see a complete stranger running away with one of her children.

    Quick thinking and protective, the mother was able to chase down 29-year-old Dustin Sherman and wrestle her child from his arms.

    "He was carrying her like he was carrying his own child," the mother said. "He was holding her close you know trying to hold her really close to him and that bothered me really bad."

    Sherman was arrested, and authorities say he has a criminal history that includes battery on a peace officer as well as domestic violence charges.Read more from KOB here.

    (Published Friday, Sept. 30, 2016)

    Wu added, "We don't need salvation. We like our color and our culture and our own strengths and our own stories ... we don't need you to save us from anything."

    In the aftermath of her lengthy criticism, Wu followed up with a clarification, nothing that she only hoped to bring "awareness" to Damon's casting.

    "Not blaming Damon, the studio, the Chinese financiers. It's not about blame, It's about AWARENESS," Constance wrote.

    PHOTOS: Celebrities Discuss Diversity in Hollywood

    Airlines Reading, Responding to Social Media Rants

    [NATL-DFW] Airlines Reading, Responding to Social Media Rants
    A new study says airlines are reading posts made by customers complaining over delayed or canceled flights and poor service, and are responding to those messages. Dallas-based Southwest Airlines has a team tracking Twitter, Facebook and other online sites 24 hours a day. When a customer vents about a problem, a representative reaches out to them. "The approach is really how can we help, wait a minute we hate to hear that.... so what is going on, give us some information and let's see what we can do to straighten this out," said Lisa Goode, with Southwest Airlines. Social media teams help airlines by rebooking customers or by helping keep them more calm by relaying information when problems crop up. (Published Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016)