SJSU Examines Typhoon For Weather Models, Trends

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Aid workers are still assessing the damage caused by the huge typhoon that struck the Philippines Thursday. Back here in the Bay Area, experts are awestruck about the size and magnitude of the storm. Damian Trujillo reports. (Published Friday, Nov 8, 2013)

    Aid workers are still assessing the damage caused by the huge typhoon that struck the Philippines Thursday.

    Back here in the Bay Area, experts are awestruck about the size and magnitude of the storm.

    The storm's size is estimated at about 500 miles wide, bigger than Katrina, said Alison Bridger, San Jose State University's meteorology department chair.

    MORE: Philippines Battered by Fearsome Typhoon Haiyan

    Bridger and other scientists are using what's called a "Dvorak" technique to measure a typhoon's intensity.

    Experts said the super typhoon is up there with the worst storms.

    The university's meteorology and climate science department will use all the data collected from the typhoon to improve weather models and look for weather trends.

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