Separated Families Won't Be Immediately Reunited: HHS - NBC Bay Area
Immigration in America

Immigration in America

Full coverage of immigration issues in the U.S.

Separated Families Won't Be Immediately Reunited: HHS

The children who are separated from their families are turned over to HHS within 72 hours and are then categorized as unaccompanied minors who are eventually placed with sponsors

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Trump Ends Migrant Family Separations

    President Trump has reversed his zero tolerance immigration policy with an executive order that will stop agents from separating children and parents detained at the border. (Published Wednesday, June 20, 2018)

    An official with Health and Human Services says the more than 2,300 children separated from their parents at the border as a result of a zero-tolerance policy on illegal crossings won't be immediately reunited with their families.

    Kenneth Wolfe, a spokesman for the department's Administration for Children and Families, says their cases will proceed through the system.

    HHS Secretary Alex Azar said his department will start reuniting detained immigrant children with their parents, but he made no specific commitment on how quickly that can be accomplished. And officials said the cases of the children already separated and turned over to their custody would proceed as usual.

    The children who are separated from their families are turned over to HHS within 72 hours and are then categorized as unaccompanied minors who are eventually placed with sponsors. Officials have said they were working to reunite families as soon as possible but provided no clear answers on how that was going to happen.

    Trump Signs Executive Order Temporarily Ending Migrant Family Separations

    [NATL] Trump Signs Executive Order Temporarily Ending Migrant Family Separations

    President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday to temporarily stop the practice of separating migrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border. The order maintains the administration’s zero-tolerance prosecution policy for those crossing into the U.S. illegally. The executive order may present new legal challenges as it goes against an established legal ruling.

    (Published Wednesday, June 20, 2018)

    President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order that stopped the separations.