NFL Coaches Live the Life of Praise Players in Public, Purge in Private - NBC Bay Area

NFL Coaches Live the Life of Praise Players in Public, Purge in Private

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Jon Gruden's arrival made Marshawn Lynch expendable.
     
    Oh, sure this will be listed on Doug Martin's legacy, as his new deal with the Oakland Raiders makes Lynch a likely early casualty in the Gruden Part Deux Era, but just as Jack Del Rio was hired by Mark Davis as a sop to the fan base he was planning to abandon, so too was Lynch, and finally Gruden.

     And this just unchecks a thrice-checked box. Lynch as a face of the franchise was Mark Davis' idea, he was one of the faces of a 6-10 team, and Gruden as the new face of the franchise has other ideas about whose face has the force of law.
     
    At least that's one superficial and probably misleading read from Martin's signing, as the now-former Tampa Bay running back basically takes Lynch's spot on Gruden's first roster. It is a football decision (Martin may still have more tread), it is a cultural decision (Gruden isn't all that warm or fuzzy with the employees) and it's a new boss decision (Gruden wants his guys, not someone else's).
     
    But it also reminds us that coaches are liars unless forced into the truth, and when Gruden lauded Lynch a month ago, veteran observers could hear his fingers crossing themselves. After all, the rule of thumb for any public figure who isn't either crazy or narcisstic is always "praise in public, purge in private," and people who know Gruden well couldn't see him nuzzling up to Lynch only to discipline him later for all the things he was allowed to do under Del Rio.
     
    The same logic is being applied to the attraction for Jordy Nelson as a replacement for Michael Crabtree – well, except the mileage part. Gruden is recreating the Raiders in his image, which not only puts an interesting ellipsis on his own resume but puts all but a few players from the old regime (or regimes) in danger of being relocated.
     
    And while we're at it, the same is true for Kyle Shanahan in San Francisco, who watched center Daniel Kilgore get a new deal last month and traded to Miami this month – giving a fresh interpretation to the notion of being day-to-day. In the NFL, everyone is, right up to the door of the owner's suite.
     
    Whether the Martin signing is a good idea or not remains to be determined, of course, because the future has an odd way of not obeying the needs of the present, and March's good idea can become October's mistake. But Gruden reminded us yet again that coaches aren't to be taken seriously when they say something in public because they don't regard anything they say as binding. Every answer is simply a placeholder until it has to be changed, and that's a valuable lesson for us to remember the next time we think a coach is leveling with us on anything. They live in an autocorrect world, and when it comes to taking them at their word, we should remember that.