San Diego May Change "Edible" Marijuana Guidelines

After two deaths in Denver, Colorado have been linked to marijuana use, San Diego city officials are considering a change to edibles

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    NEWSLETTERS

    San Diego city officials are looking into improved regulations on marijuana products, many known as “edibles,” after two deaths in Denver, Colorado were linked to marijuana-use.

    The city’s Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee recently reviewed current medical marijuana regulations and passed numerous amendments except one regarding edibles.

    “I wanted some regulations so we could offer the public some reassurance, some regulatory entity to make sure it's safe for consumption,” said Councilmember Marti Emerald of District 9. “My colleagues on the committee said 'Well let's take a closer look at that.’"

    Currently, San Diego Municipal Code spells out basic regulations on "Edible Products and Concentrates." They must be labeled with the patient's name, dispensing date, name and address of the co-op, a warning label and the source.

    NBC 7 spoke to University Heights resident Erin Andrews who takes edibles to help with stomach pains.

    “I saw lemon bars for sale that had weed in them, they had the ingredients, the percentage of THC in them and all that stuff and I think it should be required,” Andrews said.

    Adding to the concern, two deaths out of Colorado were recently tied to edibles. The investigations are still on going, officials said one man jumped to his death after eating a cookie with marijuana and another man allegedly shot and killed his wife after eating marijuana candy. Studies are still mixed about any sort of connection between marijuana and violent behavior.

    Still, Councilmember Emerald says it's imperative San Diego takes a proactive approach.

    “This industry is here to stay, which means it's only going to get bigger. More consumers are going to make their decisions on their perception that somebody’s watching the store or well-being,” she said.

    The committee is working with the City Attorney’s office to continue research on edibles. Their next meeting is in July.