Forecast: A Tale of Two Regions

Natural air-conditioning cools the coast and the City

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Yep, you'll definitely want to stay hydrated.

    It's going to be hot hot hot here in the Bay Area.

    But if the triple digit prediction has you worried, fear not.  All you have to do is head up to the City for instant relief.

    The San Francisco Bay Area is expected to be mostly sunny today with high temperatures up to 100 degrees in all inland locations.

    But on the coast it may not break out of the 70s.   San Francisco's natural air-conditioning, otherwise known as fog, was still lingering at the base of the Golden Gate Bridge Sunday morning.

    Sunday night the Bay Area is expected to be mostly clear, with patchy fog after midnight and low temperatures in the upper 50s. Variable winds of 5 to 20 mph are anticipated.

    Monday the Bay Area is expected to be mostly sunny with patchy fog in the morning, and high temperatures in the 80s to 90s on the coast and up to 101 inland. West winds of 5 to 10 mph are anticipated on the coast with southwest winds of 5 to 10 mph inland.

    The heatwave is also affecting air quality.

    The Bay Area Air Quality Management District is declaring Monday a Spare the Air day and is urging residents to work from home, carpool or take public transit.

    "Carpooling and taking transit are excellent ways to reduce our overall pollution and help prevent unhealthy air," Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the air district, said in a prepared statement.

    The air district issues summertime Spare the Air alerts whenever ozone pollution is forecast to reach unhealthy concentrations.

    Ozone can cause throat irritation, congestion and chest pain. It can trigger asthma, inflame the lining of the lungs and worsen bronchitis and emphysema. Long-term exposure can reduce lung function.

    Transit is not free Monday and there is no wood-burning ban in place.

    For more information about Spare the Air, visit www.sparetheair.org.