Jennifer Siebel-Newsom's New Starring Role

Wife of San Francisco Mayor promoting Juice Beauty products

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Justin Sullivan / Getty
    Jennifer Siebel-Newsom can now add "TV pitchwoman" to her resume.

    If the beauty products in your life just aren't organic enough, then does Jennifer Siebel-Newsom have a deal for you.

    For just two easy payments of $19.50, you'll receive a 30-day supply of Juice Beauty products. Order now, and you'll receive free Blemish Clearing Powder and an Eco-Bamboo Headband, a $34 value!

    According to Siebel-Newsom, "Since becoming a mother, I've become more aware and cautious about the products I use on my daughter and myself. I'm so excited to have found Juice Beauty."

    Also, she says that you'll see a difference in two weeks, guaranteed!

    Plus, a percentage of all sales will help fund her documentary project, Miss Representation.

    And you don't have to take Siebel-Newsom's word for it -- the television campaign also features one Kim Cores, Ph.D. who explains that the Coq10 and Vitamin C -- presumably from the organic juices in the product -- will help kill the bacteria that causes acne.

    Cordes isn't actually a dermatologist, but a postdoctoral fellow at the University of San Francisco's Srivastava Lab investigating "the molecular events regulating developmental decisions that instruct cardiac progenitor cells to adopt a cardiac cell fate and subsequently fashion a functioning heart," which doesn't seem very relevant to a skincare regimen, but there you go.

    The real question is, do they make organic hair products, too? Because surely San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom doesn't want the couple's young daughter being exposed to the harsh chemicals in L'Oreal Total Control Clean Gel like "PVP/VA Copolymer, Triethanolamine, Carbomer, Niacinamide, Calcium Pantothenate, Panthenol, Pyridoxine HCl, Dimethicone Copolyol, Hydroxypropylcellulose."

    It is, however, alcohol free, just like the mayor.

    Jackson West wonders if there's an irony in a woman producing a documentary about sexism shilling beauty products to people insecure about their appearance.