Abandoned 3-Legged Cat Looking for Fur-Ever Home - NBC Bay Area

Abandoned 3-Legged Cat Looking for Fur-Ever Home

The rescued cat, now named Armstrong, underwent surgery to amputate his leg earlier this week.

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    Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA
    A three-legged cat was rescued from a busy intersection near Old Town Pasadena. Veterinarians believe the cat had likely been suffering for days or weeks and are unsure if the injuries were accidental or deliberate. The above picture shows Armstrong after having his leg amputated.

    A three-legged cat that was abandoned in Los Angeles is looking for a fur-ever home for the holidays.

    Now that the kitty named Armstrong is recovering after surgery, the shelter that is treating him hopes he will be adopted once he fully recovers.

    The cat was rescued from a busy intersection near Old Town Pasadena after somebody called a local shelter reporting a cat with a visibly broken leg.

    Armstrong, pictured above, before undergoing surgery to amputate his leg.

    Pasadena Humane Society animal control officers found the cat with a "painful exposed fracture" to his right front leg near Green Street and Oakland Avenue in Pasadena. He limped to animal control officers "as if he knew help had arrived," the shelter said.

    The veterinary team at the shelter found that the cat has suffered a double fracture in his right front leg. They believe the cat has been suffering for days and weeks, as the injury appears to have happened a while ago. It is unclear if the injuries to Armstrong were accidental or deliberate.

    Armstrong underwent surgery to amputate his leg earlier this week and will recover in foster care for the next two weeks, the shelter said.

    "He is a friendly cat who we hope will be adopted quickly once he recovers from his injuries," said Julie Bank, President/CEO of the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA.

    For more information about adopting Armstrong, email adoptions@pasadenahumane.org or call 626-792-7151.