Susan B. Anthony's Grave Decorated With 'I Voted' Stickers - NBC Bay Area
Decision 2018

Decision 2018

The latest news on local, state and national midterm elections

Susan B. Anthony's Grave Decorated With 'I Voted' Stickers

Images of the headstone covered in voting stickers quickly became widely shared on social media

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    Cast Your Vote, Take a Sticker

    Check out some of the different stickers being handed out at polling places across the country on Election Day 2018. (Published Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018)

    Voters showed up by the dozens to put their "I Voted" stickers on the headstone of Susan B. Anthony, an Election Day ritual that pays homage to the voting rights pioneer.

    Deborah L. Hughes, President and CEO of National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House, said there were already a few dozen stickers decorating the gravesite by the time she arrived around 10 a.m. Images of the headstone covered in voting stickers quickly became widely shared on social media.

    Jessica Crane drove 40 minutes to add her sticker to celebrate "everything we have accomplished and have yet to accomplish."

    Visiting Anthony's gravesite on Election Day has become a popular ritual in recent years. Hughes said thousands turned out in 2016 for the presidential matchup between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

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    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)