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Sony SmartWatch 2: No Worries for Apple

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
    Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an Apple product announcement at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California.

    When are we going to have a smartwatch? Apparently the time is now, and despite the few that are out there, including Samsung's Galaxy Gear, aren't really capturing the zeitgeist. Perhaps everyone's waiting for a rumored Apple iWatch? If so, then the latest Sony SmartWatch, shouldn't make Apple lose any sleep.

    The Sony SmartWatch 2 starts at $199.99 and has improved its design in the last 18 months since the first SmartWatch made its debut, according to The Verge. It has improved, from its looks to its Android-like interface, however it's still not as quick or as nimble as the average smartphone.

    Like most wearable computers, the SmartWatch 2 must be paired with a smartphone to work, and in Sony's case that means Android only. That's probably why it looks a lot like an Android product, however, users will probably find themselves ditching the watch to use their smartphone rather than waiting for the SmartWatch 2 to load. The display isn't that great to look at either, at only 220 by 176 resolution, the view is often pixelated. Apps can ony be downloaded through Sony's Smart Connect app, which is an added step

    Unlike the larger watches, it is only 1.63 ounces (Galaxy Gear is 2.6 ounces) and won't seem awkward when worn and it does boast water resistance. According to The Verge, one of the main problem seems to be its software that allows the SmartWatch 2 to receive all your emails and messages but with often delayed notifications -- or worse, constant email notifications because users can't delete them "or mark them as read." In short, it's not a very smart watch. It doesn't even have a microphone or speaker.

    While it has a few days of battery life, it likely doesn't make up for a substandard display or extra steps to add apps.
    Apple's rumored iWatch needs to have services that its users want, that work quickly and seemlessly and create a design that doesn't make its owner look stupid. If it can do that, then the iWatch may stand a chance in the wearable computer market.