Prop Zero
The Starting Point for Commentary and Coverage of California Politics

David Cameron, You'd Fit California

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    NEWSLETTERS

    You may have read that British Prime Minister David Cameron is in a spot of political trouble. (Yes, you're meant to read the last sentence in your poshest English accent).

    If he can't survive the scandal over tabloid phone hacking, police payoffs and his own close ties to the News Corp. executives responsible for such behavior, Cameron should think about relocating to California.

    He could have a bright political future here.

    For one thing, Cameron, a Tory, is precisely the sort of socially moderate, politically conservative type that Californians tend to elect governor.

    For another, Cameron's logic in the debate over the United Kingdom's relationship with the European Union. Cameron recently declared that he wouldn't permit a referendum on the country's continued membership in the EU -- because the voters had already spoken on the subject.

    Of course, those voters last spoke on the subject 36 years ago.

    That's pure California logic. Whenever someone suggests a change in course in our state's governing system, they are quickly told that the voters have spoken, even if the voter decision occured decades ago, whether the verdict was Prop 13 in 1978 or Prop 98 in 1988.

    One difference is that Cameron is facing criticism for this kind of logic because some UK journalists have figured out that the British voters of 36 years ago are the not the same people as the British voters of today.

    In California, Cameron wouldn't face that sort of criticism.

    Californians have gotten used to the bad idea that once something is decided at the ballot, it's decided forever.