"Biggest Loser" to Tackle Childhood Obesity

Three teens will be featured in the weightloss show's Sunday night debut on NBC.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    When the Biggest Loser returns to NBC on Sunday, the country will be watching as three teens fight to lose weight and gain self-esteem while the hit weight-loss show tackles the epidemic of childhood obesity for the first time in its 14-season run. Ted Chen reports for the NBC4 News at 8 p.m. on Jan. 5, 2013. (Published Saturday, Jan 5, 2013)

    When the Biggest Loser returns to NBC on Sunday, the country will be watching as three teens fight to lose weight and gain self-esteem while the hit weight-loss show tackles the epidemic of childhood obesity for the first time in its 14-season run.

    "It's just so tough to be an overweight teen because it affects so many different aspects of your life," said contestant Sanjana "Sunny" Chandrasekar.

    Sunny will join Lindsey Bravo and Noah “Biingo” Gray as the first children to be featured on the Biggest Loser. And it’s perfect timing for trainer Jillian Michaels, who is returning to the show as a first-time mother.

    Motherhood has “made me all the more demanding,” she said. “It’s like, it’s taken a lot for me to be here right now and I expect you to give a lot.”

    The trio is coming into the challenge with varying, age-appropriate goals, including finding a “really cute” junior prom dress.

    “Not feeling like people are laughing are you ‘cause you're wearing a nice shirt that's tight on you and they just call you rolls,” said Lindsey Bravo, contestant.

    For Noah “Biingo” Gray, he’s looking to gain something else that he said has eluded him: a girlfriend.

    Because they’re children, the show’s challenges won’t be about the numbers and there won’t be any weigh-ins or elimination for Sunny, Lindsey and Biingo. Instead, there will be plenty of working out, lessons about eating well, and having fun.

    “It’s about getting them to run around and chase a ball and be a kid again and get away from computer devices,” said trainer Bob Harper.

    And it’ll be a family affair.

    “It’s about educating parents,” said trainer Dolvett Quince. “It’s about insisting. The more education the parents have, the more successful their children are going to be.”

     

     

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