Bay Area City Closes Year By Shutting Down

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Associated Press
    This is the sign the city of Fremont is putting up the final two weeks of 2010.

    The city of Fremont is latest principality to shut things down in the name of budget cuts. 

    On Monday, Fremont's Assistant City Manager issued a press release that announced the entire city, minus emergency workers, would go on furlough the two weeks surrounding Christmas: 

    As a result of on-going budget reductions, the majority of City of Fremont offices will be closed for a 2-week furlough beginning Dec. 20, 2010. City offices will re-open for business on Jan. 3, 2011. The furlough days will not affect police and fire services.

     Annabell Holland, with the city, said the last time Fremont had to do a shut down like this it was 1994.

    As the Bay Area's fourth largest city, the move is sure to have an impact not only on the people who get a city paycheck, but for the citizens of Fremont who might need to do business the final two weeks of 2010.  

    Affected offices:

    • City Hall
    • Building A
    • Building B (except Parks and Recreation, Life Elder care and the Afghan Elderly Association)
    • Development Services Center, 39550 Liberty St.
    • Maintenance Center, 42551 Osgood Rd.
    • All Community Centers (except the Irvington Community Center, which will be open Dec. 27-29)

    Fremont officials say the city's animal shelters will also continue to provide regular services. And a few city staffers will also be on call for possible emergencies such as storm damage. You can get more specific information at this link or by calling (510) 494-4328.

    Fremont is like most cities in California and is facing huge budget deficits. The Oakland Tribune pointed out in the past week the projections show pensions are taking an even bigger chunk than expected out of city coffers and the unions aren't budging on giveback requests. 

    Silicon Valley tech companies often shut down the final two weeks of the year. Fremont's announcement is part of a growing trend, started by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who forced state workers to take furlough days in order to help relieve the state budget crisis.