Quan: We Had to Bring Camp to an End

Three eviction ordered were issued prior to raid.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Protesters at the Occupy Oakland encampment are staying put tonight, despite orders to pack up and leave.

    Oakland Police and other Bay Area departments have removed protesters' tents from the Occupy Oakland protesters at Frank Ogawa Plaza. A heavy police presence remains near the corner of 14th Street and Broadway.

    At least 32 people were arrested, according to Oakland Police. One group of protesters, about a dozen and referred to as "interfaith protesters" by other Occupy Oakland residents, were detained by police and removed from their place on the street.

    Raw video: Occupy Oakland Prepped for Raid

    [BAY] Raw video: Occupy Oakland Prepped for Raid
    Oakland Police are staged to serve a cease-and-desist order on the Occupy Oakland protesters this morning.

    Oakland Mayor Jean Quan said following the raid that she was releived on behalf of the city that the raid ended peacefully.

    "We had to bring a camp to an end before more people were hurt," Quan said.

    Protesters announced on the Occupy Oakland website that if the camp is evicted they will reconvene at the Oakland Public Library at 125 14th St. at 4 p.m.

    More than five weeks into the protest that has already seen tear gas, forcible removal and political repercussions for the mayor of Oakland, occupiers were served eviction notices on several occasions last week.

    [Read the eviction notice here.]

    This morning's actions follow an email alert sent to protesters at around 3 a.m., according to the Mercury News. The email included, "The goal is to permanently clear out the OO encampment of illegal activities. Expect to see overwhelming use of force by police directed to occupiers who refuse to comply."

    [A livestream video from the scene is here.]

    Last week a man was shot and killed near the encampment. It was later reported that he was not invovled with the protest.

    On Oct. 25, Oakland Police moved to disperse the encampment, using tear gas and significant force. Video of one man being struck in the head by a tear gas canister also pulled more attention to the Occupy Oakland protesters.

    The Oakland Police Officers Association has also released a letter explaining that the force, itself, is part of the "99 percent" and that using its resources to address Occupy takes away from its ability to police the rest of the city.

    The 12th Street/City Center BART station has been closed, with trains not stopping due to police activity much of Monday morning.