San Francisco Startup Delivers Pot to Medical Marijuana Patients

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A San Francisco start-up is making it possible for medical marijuana patients to get pot delivered to their doorsteps. Kimberly Tere reports. (Published Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014)

    A San Francisco startup is making it possible for medical marijuana patients to get pot delivered to their doorsteps.

    Eazeup.com launched on Tuesday and provides pot to its customers as long as they have a valid medical marijuana card. Keith McCarty, who founded the company, wants people to think of his business as the Uber of pot.

    "At the beginning of each caregiver's shift, they'll actually pick up the medicine for the day so they'll actually have it with them already," McCarty said. "We'll only route the caregiver to the patient that has the medicine that they are looking for."

    The service is free for patients who register with the company.

    "The process of acquiring medical marijuana can be somewhat cumbersome," McCarty said. "We want to make that easier for patients by allowing for a single source of verification, and all they have to do is no matter where they are, select their strain of medicine, the quantity that they need and click 'request delivery.'"

    McCarty said carriers will deliver "in a matter of minutes."

    Some patients are in favor of the new service.

    "For me, being very busy and also wanting to be discreet, having a service like this is really beneficial," Seibo Shen said. "But I do see patients who have trouble getting around and for them, this will be a Godsend."

    Company drivers are paid $10 by the dispensaries for each delivery. Drivers also are required to have a medical marijuana card, own their own vehicle and carry insurance.

    "I'm treating it like a regular, old delivery company," said Leo Flores, a San Francisco State University student who is delivering for Eazeup.com during his summer break.

    Flores said he made a dozen deliver in the first three hours of his shift, which amounts to $40 an hour.