'Slow Money' Keeps Food, Economy Local

The principles around 'Slow Money' are sustainability and long-term thinking about how and what we buy.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    15,000 people have signed the Slow Money Principles. 2,000 have become members of the Slow Money Alliance, including over 220 Founding Members—many leaders in social investing and sustainable agriculture.

    With the Great Recession barely in the rear view mirror, the term "slow money" could be mistaken for how 401k's have been performing.

    Actually, it's about keeping your money local -- and with some driving principles behind it.

    The goals of SlowMoney.org lean specifically to a local food system, giving back to the ground what is taken out.

    Based on the 2009 book "Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money: Investing As If Food Farms and Fertility Mattered," sustainability comes to the fore as groups of like-minded people try to close the food-consumption loop -- while looping out mega-farms and agri-warehousing.

    This Sunday, the Northern California Regional Showcase will host an Entrepreneur Showcase of Slow Money, with "more than 200 investors, entrepreneurs and food and farming leaders who are rebuilding our local food system," according to their site.

    If organic, locally produced -- and incredibly tasty -- food is of interest to you, head to Fort Mason for all the right reasons.