"In God We Trust" Not Unconstitutional

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    A clock and the motto "In God We Trust" over the Speaker's rostrum in the U.S. House of Representatives chamber are seen December 8, 2008 in Washington, DC. Members of the media were allowed access to film and photograph the room for the first time in six years.

    Michael Newdow's faith is being tested.

    The Sacramento doctor and attorney has been on a four year journey to remove the words "In God We Trust" from U.S. currency.

    Monday the United State's Supreme Court refused to hear Newdow's latest challenge to the phrase.

    The atheist has had argued that government references to God are unconstitutional and infringe on his religious beliefs.

    He was appealing a decision last March by the 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in San Francisco  who said the phrase is ceremonial and patriotic and "has nothing whatsoever to do with the establishment of religion."

    Monday the Supreme Court refused to hear the appeal.

    Newdow has also sued to ban prayer at presidential inaugurations and to ban the phrase "under God" from the Pledge of Allegiance. He has never won a court battle.