Silicon Valley Ageism Stifles Medical Innovation

Too bad these kids don't want to disrupt cancer.

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Is your new company trying to help people with medical needs? Sorry, no money for you.

    But you say you have a new social network? I bet we can find $100 million for you.

    Ageism is running rampant in Silicon Valley, where 20-somethings with "fresh" ideas are king, and people over 35 with experience coding or handling capital are being sidelined, according to the New Republic's lengthy article on the subject.

    But in addition to punishing people for being old, this race to find the next young thing is also stifling progress in medicine, MedCityNews.com observed.

    Take the story of startup founder Mark Goldenson. He'd founded two start-ups by the time he turned 30, one for an online "game show," the magazine reported.

    Both failed. So then he had an idea to start a company that helps people find psychiatric counseling online. It had "enormous social value" in the United States, where mental health problems go untreated -- but in Silicon Valley, he could find no takers.

    He "never had more trouble raising money," he told the New Republic.

    MedCityNews hopes that after Mark Zuckerberg turns 30 and is over the hill -- next month, in fact -- he and the other titans of tech "start funding companies that really make a difference."

    Meanwhile, be sure to share these feelings via Snapchat.