Coastal Quake Still Has Locals Shaking

Saturday's quake was located within the interior of the so-called Gorda Plate

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    A magnitude-6.3 quake struck Italy Sunday.

    As the earth continues to shake along the Northern California coast, damage dollar numbers continue to stack up.

    Another small aftershock hit Monday night, re-ruffling already ruffled nerves in Humboldt County.

    This weekend's earthquake is the strongest to hit California in six years.   The magnitude 6.5 shaker hit 26 miles off the Eureka coast Saturday at 4:27 p.m.

    Damage was widespread across the region, but considered relatively minor for the size of the earthquake.

    That "minor" damage is quickly adding up to the millions.  Officials in Eureka say the quake caused $22 million in damage in that city alone.  They say 175 buildings were damaged by the shaker.

    One family who lived in a 100 year old home that dropped into its crawl space is now forced to find a new place to live.

    Theresa Brady told the Associated Press her home is "a disaster."

    "When you go into my house, you feel you're on acid or something because everything is crooked," said Brady.

    So far no Humboldt County-wide estimate is available.

    A security camera caught the entire quake in Arcata.


    The weekend quake followed a series of small quakes here in the Bay Area and had lots of people talking about "The Big One."

    Saturday's quake was located within the interior of the so-called Gorda Plate.  Geologists say because it was shallow, only four miles deep, it was fairly gentle rolling quake.

    Experts say there are no comparable stresses known off the Bay Area's coast.  For us, the dangerous faults run under highly populated landmass.

    And the really good news is that the movement off shore in Humboldt County does not increase risks of slips in the Hayward and San Andreas.