NFL Owners Kick Off Meetings in Houston, Oakland Raiders Fate in Balance | NBC Bay Area

NFL Owners Kick Off Meetings in Houston, Oakland Raiders Fate in Balance

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The Raiders, Chargers and Rams have filed for relocation all in the Los Angeles beginning in the 2016 season, according to the NFL. Pete Suratos reports. (Published Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016)

    NFL owners are kicking off two days of meetings in Houston Tuesday that will determine the future of the teams in Oakland, Los Angeles and St. Louis.

    The Raiders, Chargers and Rams have filed for relocation all in the Los Angeles beginning in the 2016 season, the NFL said Monday night.

    The Chargers want to partner with the Raiders on a stadium in Carson. The Rams are pursuing a site in Inglewood. The relocation of a franchise requires a three-quarters vote of the NFL clubs, meaning 24 out of 32 votes.

    While the city and county leaders in Oakland - not to mention the passionate Raiders fans - don't want to lose the team, the issue comes down to funding.

    NFL Owners Kick Off Meetings in Houston, Oakland Raiders Fate in BalanceNFL Owners Kick Off Meetings in Houston, Oakland Raiders Fate in Balance

    NFL owners are kicking off two days of meetings in Houston Tuesday that will determine the future of the teams in Oakland, Los Angeles and St. Louis. Pete Suratos reports.
    (Published Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016)

    Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf has vowed not to spend public money on a new stadium. While the Raiders have said the team would spend up to $500 on a new stadium, the total cost is estimated at $900 million, leaving a $400-million gap for a proposed 55,000-seat stadium.

    Schaaf has said Oakland could pitch in $90 million of that gap in the form of infrastructure improvements that would also help businesses in the area - but no more than that.

    Oakland city and Alameda County officials sent a letter to NFL executive vice president Eric Grubman on Dec. 29 offering a series of concepts and using words like "willing partners" and "exploring public tools." But she offered no formal proposal.

    Compare that to the other cities: San Diego has proposed about $350 million in public subsidies, and St. Louis has detailed a $1.1 billion stadium plan, funded 50 percent through city and state taxes, the Mercury News reports.

    A decision is expected Wednesday night.

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