Wakamatsu: Rediscovering America’s First Issei

0919 Wakamatsu
Join us for an inaugural biennial pilgrimage to the site of the first large settlement
of Japanese in America. A national and state historic landmark, the Wakamatsu Tea
and Silk Farm Colony was established June 8, 1869. It is also the birthplace of first
Japanese American, and the grave site of the first Japanese woman buried in the
U.S., Okei Ito.
This year’s pilgrimage is a rare opportunity to learn about the storied history of this
colony led by John Schnell and former samurai from Aizu-Wakamatsu, present-day
Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Participants can trace their own roots through family
history consultations with volunteers from the California Genealogical Society.

Join the Nichi Bei Foundation for an inaugural biennial pilgrimage to the site of the first large settlementof Japanese in America. A national and state historic landmark, the Wakamatsu Tea and Silk Farm Colony was established June 8, 1869. It is also the birthplace of first Japanese American, and the grave site of the first Japanese woman buried in the US, Okei Ito.

This year’s pilgrimage is a phenomenal opportunity to learn about the storied history of this colony led by John Schnell and former samurai from Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan. Participants can trace their own roots through family history consultations with volunteers from the California Genealogical Society.

Tickets are $70 ($60 for Nichi Bei Foundation members/subscribers).

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here.

Where: Wakamatsu Tea and Silk Colony - 941 Cold Springs Rd, Placerville, CA

When: Saturday, October 7 - 11:30AM-3PM

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