Health
New England Journal of Medicine 36 mins ago

More Americans Are Dying at Home Rather Than in Hospitals

For the first time since the early 1900s, more Americans are dying at home rather than in hospitals, a trend that reflects more hospice care and progress toward the kind of end that most people say they want. Deaths in nursing homes also have declined, according to Wednesday’s report in the New England Journal of Medicine. “It’s a good thing. Death

  • Dec 5

    Drug Can Curb Dementia’s Delusions, Researchers Find

    A drug that curbs delusions in Parkinson’s patients did the same for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia in a study that was stopped early because the benefit seemed clear.

  • Dec 4

    Bankruptcy Judge Considers $1.3M Bonus for Purdue Pharma CEO

    The judge overseeing the bankruptcy case of OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma will consider Wednesday whether the company’s CEO should get a bonus equal to half his $2.6 million salary.

  • Dec 1

    Hunger on Campus: The Fight Against Student Food Insecurity

    While most Americans will be grateful for second and third helpings this Thanksgiving, there’s one surprising group who struggle to find a first helping every day: students at some of the nation’s top universities, NBC News reports. “I can’t go to the grocery store to buy breakfast because if I use this money I’m not going to be able to

  • Dec 1

    HIV Vaccine in 2021? Leading Experts ‘Optimistic’ About Ongoing Trials

    On Sunday, World AIDS Day, the global fight against the human immunodeficiency virus is poised to make important advances thanks to three experimental HIV vaccines that are entering the final stages of testing at sites across the globe, NBC News reports. While any of these three late-stage HIV vaccine trials — known as HVTN 702, Imbokodo and Mosaico — could

  • Dec 1

    To Stop Teen Vaping, States Turn to Reliable Remedy: Taxes

    The World Health Organization estimates that a 10 percent rise in prices causes overall smoking rates to drop about 4 percent in high-income countries. Some states are relying on this strategy to work again ― this time to discourage consumers, especially teenagers and young adults, from using e-cigarettes and vaping products, NBC News reports.Get more at Read More

  • Nov 29

    15-Ounce ‘Micro-Preemie’ Raising Awareness for Holiday Blood Donations

    A tiny baby born four months early and weighing just 15-ounces has already made a name for herself at the San Diego Blood Bank.

  • Nov 29

    Some Nursing Homes Illegally Evict Residents Who Can’t Afford to Pay

    When Jamie Moore arrived home on a Thursday evening in March, she was surprised to find her mother-in-law in her living room. Glenda Moore, 67, had been sitting in her wheelchair for hours. Without anyone to help her to the bathroom, she’d had an accident. She was also having trouble breathing. “It was awful,” Jamie Moore recalled. Several days earlier,

  • Nov 27

    E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Calif. Romaine Lettuce Reaches 67 Cases

    U.S. health officials are warning people not to eat romaine lettuce grown in Salinas, California, after an E. coli-linked food poisoning outbreak reached 67 cases across 19 states. The Centers for Disease Control on Tuesday said 39 people had been hospitalized after contracting the food-borne illness, which can cause diarrhea, vomiting and fever. No deaths have been reported. The CDC

  • Nov 27

    Moms Are Binge Drinking More, But So Are All Women, Study Finds

    Moms are binge drinking more, but they’re not the only ones: According to a study released Tuesday, binge drinking rates are on the rise for nearly all groups of Americans, whether they have children or not, NBC News reported. “There had been a lot of media attention on the ‘mommy drinking phenomenon,’” said the study’s lead author Sarah McKetta, a

  • Nov 26

    Further Evidence Links Vitamin E Oil to Vaping Illnesses

    More evidence from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention links synthetic vitamin E oil added to illegal THC products to the vaping-related illnesses that have sickened 2,290 people, NBC News reported. In the report published Tuesday, investigators at the Minnesota Department of Health analyzed products containing THC, marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient. Twenty product samples obtained from vaping illness patients contained

  • Nov 25

    More Polio Cases Now Caused by Vaccine Than by Wild Virus

    Four African countries have reported new cases of polio linked to the oral vaccine, as global health numbers show there are now more children being paralyzed by viruses originating in vaccines than in the wild. In a report late last week, the World Health Organization and partners noted nine new polio cases caused by the vaccine in Nigeria, Congo, Central

  • Nov 25

    Stop! Washing Your Thanksgiving Turkey Could Spread Germs

    Go ahead and rinse your cranberries, potatoes and green beans. But food say experts say don’t — repeat don’t — wash the turkey before popping it in the oven on Thanksgiving Day. They say that could spread the germs lurking on your turkey in the kitchen sink or nearby food. But it’s been a challenge trying to convince cooks to

  • Nov 25

    Colleges Struggle With Soaring Student Demand for Counseling

    More college students are turning to their schools for help with anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, and many must wait weeks for treatment or find help elsewhere as campus clinics struggle to meet demand, an AP review of more than three dozen public universities found.

  • Nov 24

    Paging Dr. Robot: Artificial Intelligence Moves Into Care

    The next time you get sick, your care may involve a form of the technology people use to navigate road trips or pick the right vacuum cleaner online. Artificial intelligence is spreading into health care, often as software or a computer program capable of learning from large amounts of data and making predictions to guide care or help patients. It

  • Nov 23

    Flu Season Is Picking Up, Particularly in the South and the West, CDC Says

    Flu activity is picking up across the country, indicating an earlier start to this year’s flu season, particularly in the South and in the West, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The uptick doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to be a bad season — flu is notoriously unpredictable — but some clues from earlier this year point

  • Nov 23

    Chicken Fried Rice Recalled; May Have Plastic Bits

    A Mississippi company is recalling more than 86 tons of chicken fried rice because it may contain bits of plastic. Ajinomoto Foods North America Inc. of Oakland, Mississippi, reported the problem after customers complained, according to recall notice Friday from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

  • Nov 22

    Federal Opioid Addiction Treatment Dollars Off-Limits for Some Medical Marijuana States

    The U.S. government is barring federal dollars meant for opioid addiction treatment to be used on medical marijuana.

  • Nov 22

    US Officials: Don’t Eat Romaine Lettuce Grown in Salinas, Calif.

    U.S. health officials on Friday told people to avoid romaine lettuce grown in Salinas, California, because of another food poisoning outbreak. The warning comes almost exactly one year after a similar outbreak led to a blanket warning about tainted romaine.

  • Nov 21

    Medicare Drug Plan Finder Can Steer Seniors to Higher Costs

    Medicare’s revamped prescription plan finder can steer unwitting seniors to coverage that costs much more than they need to pay, according to people who help with sign-ups as well as program experts. Serving some 60 million Medicare recipients, the plan finder is the most commonly used tool on Medicare.gov and just got its first major update in a decade. The

  • Nov 20

    Trump to Meet on Teen Vaping as Plans for Flavor Ban Fade

    President Donald Trump will meet with medical experts, health advocates and industry representatives on the problem of underage vaping later this week, White House officials said Wednesday. Electronic cigarette use by teenagers has surged, but federal authorities have not yet finalized a plan for regulating e-cigarettes. At the White House meeting set for Friday, administration officials said Trump will hear

  • Nov 20

    AMA Calls for Total Ban on All E-Cigarette, Vaping Products

    The American Medical Association on Tuesday called for an immediate ban on all electronic cigarettes and vaping devices. The group adopted the sweeping stance at a policy-making meeting in San Diego. It aims to lobby for state and federal laws, regulations or legal action to achieve a ban, but the industry is sure to fight back.

  • Nov 19

    Hospital Psychiatric Wards Now Feel Like Prisons, Some Say

    New safety standards aimed at preventing suicides have led to overhauls inside psychiatric hospitals and emergency departments around the country, with facilities now issuing patients paper gowns, stripping artwork from walls and removing bathroom doors.

  • Nov 18

    Mailing Free Home HIV Tests Helps Detect More Infections

    Mailing free home HIV tests to high-risk men offers a potentially better strategy for detecting infections than usual care. That’s according to a U.S. government study that resulted in many more infections found — including among friends with whom recipients shared extra kits. The experiment recruited 2,600 men from online social network and music sites. Half of them were sent

  • Nov 18

    Trump Backing Off Banning Vaping Flavors Popular With Teens

    President Donald Trump is backing away from the idea of banning most flavored e-cigarettes. Trump announced a proposed ban in September, saying he wanted parents to be aware of what a problem vaping had become among teens. He made the announcement in the presence of first lady Melania Trump, who does not believe e-cigarettes should be available to children.

  • Nov 17

    White House Urgently Ramps Up Push for Drug Cost Legislation

    The White House is ramping up its push to get a bill through Congress that curbs prescription drug costs, feeling a new urgency as the impeachment investigation advances amid the 2020 election campaign. The effort has progressed beyond anything seen in years, says President Donald Trump’s top domestic policy adviser. “This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to confront these issues in

  • Nov 16

    Warren Pushes Back on Critics of Her Health Care Plan

    Elizabeth Warren pushed back against critics of her newly released plan to phase in implementation of a single-payer health care system, insisting Saturday that she is “fully committed” to “Medicare for All” and that she plans to first build on existing health care programs because “people need help right now.” “My commitment to Medicare for All is all the way,”

  • Nov 16

    Public Viewing for Kaiser CEO Bernard Tyson Scheduled on Sunday

    Kaiser Permanente will honor the late Bernard J. Tyson in a public viewing Sunday in Oakland, followed by an invitation-only service on Monday.

  • Nov 16

    Big Study Casts Doubt on Need for Many Heart Procedures

    People with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won’t cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years, a big federally funded study found. The results challenge

  • Nov 16

    Oakland Nurses Endorse Sanders as He Pitches Medicare for All

    U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, outlined his plan to convert the country’s health care system to a single-payer system as he accepted the National Nurses United union’s endorsement for president in Oakland on Friday.

  • Nov 16

    Apple Nixes Vape-Related Apps for iPhone Users

    In an effort to cease the promotion of vape culture with related deaths on the rise, Apple has announced that it will no long offer vape-related apps for iPhones.

  • Nov 15

    Old Dogs, New Tricks: 10,000 Pets Needed for Canine Aging Study

    Can old dogs teach us new tricks? Scientists are looking for 10,000 pets for the largest-ever study of aging in canines. They hope to shed light on human longevity too. The project will collect a pile of pooch data: vet records, DNA samples, gut microbes and information on food and walks. Five hundred dogs will test a pill that could

  • Nov 15

    Oklahoma Judge Reduces J&J Order in Opioid Lawsuit by $107M

    An Oklahoma judge who last summer ordered consumer products giant Johnson & Johnson to pay $572 million to help address the state’s opioid crisis on Friday reduced that amount in his final order in the case by $107 million because of his miscalculation. District Judge Thad Balkman’s latest order directs the company to pay the state $465 million. In it,

  • Nov 15

    Will You Get Dementia? Many May Not Understand Their Risk

    Many older American adults may inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it, new research suggests. Almost half of adults surveyed believed they were likely to develop dementia. The results suggest many didn’t understand the connection between physical health and brain health and how racial differences can affect dementia risk. Substantial numbers of people

  • Nov 15

    Warren Says She Won’t Immediately Push for Medicare for All

    Elizabeth Warren announced Friday that she won’t immediately push to give every American government-funded health care and instead will work to oversee passage of a sweeping “Medicare for All” program by the end of her third year if elected president — a significant step away from a plan she’s long championed.

  • Nov 14

    Climate Change Damaging Lifelong Health of Children Across the World, Medical Officials Warn

    Climate change is already damaging the health of children, and its impacts will harm the entire generation with serious health problems throughout their lives, according to a new report from the medical journal The Lancet. Scientists and health experts from 35 academic institutions and United Nations agencies said that children will suffer from a rise in infectious diseases, malnutrition and

  • Nov 13

    US Superbug Infections Rising, But Deaths Are Falling

    Drug-resistant “superbug” infections have been called a developing nightmare that could set medicine back a century, making conquered germs once again untreatable. So there’s some surprising news in a report released Wednesday: U.S. superbug deaths appear to be going down. About 36,000 Americans died from drug-resistant infections in 2017, down 18% from an estimated 44,000 in 2013, the Centers for

  • Nov 12

    Teen Needed Transplant After Lungs ‘Irreparably Damaged’ From Vaping

    A 17-year-old boy is believed to be the first person to receive a double lung transplant because of the vaping-related illness that has sickened thousands nationwide. Doctors at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, where the teen was treated, said they had never seen such scarring on someone’s lungs from vaping. “This is an evil that I haven’t faced before,”

  • Nov 11

    Cholesterol Levels Dropping in US, But Many Still Need Care

    Some good health news: Americans’ cholesterol levels are dropping, and more people at especially high risk are getting treatment. Researchers say Monday’s report suggests a controversial change in recommendations for cholesterol treatment may be starting to pay off. “It is very heartening,” said Dr. Pankaj Arora of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, who led the study. “But there is

  • Nov 11

    Vaping-Related Lung Transplant Performed at Detroit Hospital

    Doctors at a Detroit hospital have performed a double lung transplant on a man whose lungs were damaged from vaping. No other details of the transplant were released Monday by Henry Ford Health System, which has scheduled a news conference Tuesday. The patient has asked his medical team to share photographs and an update to warn others about vaping.

  • Nov 11

    Virginia Doctor Allegedly Performed Hysterectomies, Tied Fallopian Tubes Without Consent

    A Virginia doctor allegedly performed hysterectomies and tied a patient’s fallopian tubes without consent, federal authorities said in court documents, NBC News reported. Javaid Perwaiz, 69, was arrested Friday and charged with health care fraud and making false statements to federal investigators, according to papers filed in the Eastern District of Virginia. In one case, Perwaiz, an obstetrician-gynecologist in Chesapeake,

  • Nov 10

    Could Trump’s Re-Election Go Up in a Puff of ‘Smoke?’ Vapers Say Watch Out

    They’re here. They vape. And they say they’ll vote you out of office if you come for their “unicorn poop” flavored vape juice, NBC News reports. Facing a perfect storm of threats from federal, state and local governments, vapers are banding together politically to defend a product that they claim saves lives and that has created a livelihood for some

  • Nov 8

    CDC Says It’s Made a Breakthrough in Finding Possible Cause of Deadly Vaping Illness

    U.S. health officials finally have a potential breakthrough in the vaping illness outbreak that’s killed at least 39 people, narrowing in on vitamin E acetate as a “potential toxin of concern,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials said Friday. The compound used in supplements, cosmetics and vaping products was detected in all 29 lung tissue samples from patients that

  • Nov 8

    10 Hospitalized From Oklahoma Facility After Flu Shot Mix-Up

    Ten people at an Oklahoma care facility for people with intellectual disabilities were hospitalized after they were apparently accidentally injected with what’s believed to be insulin rather than flu shots, authorities said. Emergency responders were called Wednesday afternoon to the Jacquelyn House in Bartlesville, about 40 miles (65 kilometers) north of Tulsa, on a report of an unresponsive person and

  • Nov 8

    Scientists Confirm Discovery of ‘New’ HIV Strain

    Scientists have confirmed the existence of an additional strain of HIV that has been around for decades, according to findings published Wednesday in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, NBC News reports. The strain is not new; rather, what’s changed is the technology used to study the virus. “The subtype has been around as long as all the other

  • Nov 8

    China Sentences Fentanyl Traffickers After US Tip About Ring

    A Chinese court sentenced nine fentanyl traffickers on Thursday in a case that is the culmination of a rare collaboration between Chinese and U.S. law enforcement to crack down on global networks that manufacture and distribute lethal synthetic opioids. Liu Yong was sentenced to death with a two-year reprieve, while Jiang Juhua and Wang Fengxi were sentenced to life in

  • Nov 7

    E-Cig Maker Juul Halts Sales of Its Popular Mint Flavor

    Market leading e-cigarette company Juul is halting sales of its popular mint flavor, the company announced Thursday. Studies published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association found high school students use mint more than any other of Juul’s flavors. Juul said it made the decision to pull mint in light of the results.

  • Nov 6

    2 Million Pounds of Chicken Recalled Over Possible Metal Contamination

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced Wednesday a massive voluntary recall of Simmons Prepared Foods fresh and frozen chicken products because of concerns that some products were contaminated with pieces of metal. The recall includes about 2,071,397 pounds of poultry produced from Oct. 21, 2019, through Nov. 4, 2019. The products were shipped to

  • Nov 6

    High School Football Player Prays With Rival Whose Mom Has Cancer

    A hard-fought Texas high school football game took a backseat to the realities of life when opponents Gage Smith and Ty Jordan came together for an emotional prayer after the final whistle last week. Smith asked Jordan if the two friends could say a prayer together for Jordan’s mother, Tiffany Jordan, 42, who has stage 4 lung and bone cancer.

  • Nov 6

    CVS to Close 22 Drugstores Next Year

    CVS Health will close 22 “underperforming” drugstores early next year in addition to the 46 stores it shuttered earlier this year, the company said Wednesday in a regulatory filing. The locations weren’t disclosed. The company recorded a $96 million impairment charge on its third-quarter earnings related to the 22 stores. It recorded a $135 million charge in the first quarter

  • Nov 6

    Judge Rejects New Trump Admin. Moral-Objection Health Rule Affecting Abortions

    A federal judge on Wednesday struck down a new rule, not yet in effect, that allowed health care providers to refuse participation in abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. U.S. District Judge Paul A. Engelmayer in New York said he was tossing out the rule in its entirety. The decision came after 19 states, the District of

  • Nov 4

    Mann Packing Co., Inc. Recalls Vegetable Products Sold in the U.S. and Canada Due to Potential Health Risks

    Mann Packing Co., Inc. announced Monday a voluntary recall of more than 100 vegetable products over concerns they may be contaminated with listeria. The recalled products were sold in the United States under a variety of brand names, such as Signature Farms, Marketside, Sysco Natural, Trader Joe’s, Del Monte, O Organics, and more. They were also sold in Canada.

  • Nov 3

    Halloween’s Over, Now What to Do With All Your Kids’ Candy

    With trick or treating over, all that candy is in your house. So now what? You can hide it from the kids, or maybe eat it yourself, but there are concerns about the amount of candy kids are consuming. “I am a really big candy fan,” says Heather Flannery. “We eat a lot of candy at our house.” The National

  • Nov 2

    US Judge Blocks Trump’s Health Insurance Rule for Immigrants

    A federal judge in Portland, Oregon, on Saturday put on hold a Trump administration rule requiring immigrants prove they will have health insurance or can pay for medical care before they can get visas. U.S. District Judge Michael Simon granted a temporary restraining order that prevents the rule from going into effect Sunday. It’s not clear when he will rule

  • Nov 2

    Illinois Marijuana Law Aims to Undo Harm of War on the Drug

    When lawmakers crafted the law legalizing marijuana in Illinois, they tried to make sure it would right what many see as past wrongs linked to the drug.

  • Nov 2

    U.S. Hospitals, FDA Grapple With Shortages of Life-Saving Drugs

    In a historic boardroom at Massachusetts General Hospital this week, the Emergency Preparedness Team assembled in what they say has become an all too frequent occurrence. More than two dozen doctors, nurses, pharmacists, tech specialists and others gathered around a conference table, a “war room” of sorts, to address the shortage of a crucial drug: the blood-thinner Heparin. “It is

  • Nov 1

    1 Dead, Others Sickened After Eating Tainted Beef

    One person has died and nine others were sickened in six states after apparently eating ground beef contaminated with salmonella, NBC News reported. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the cases Friday afternoon. Eight of the 10 individuals needed to be hospitalized. The number of those hospitalized is far greater than what health officials would normally expect to

  • Nov 1

    How Much Will Exercise Slash the Calories From Your Favorite Halloween Treats?

    More than a few parents have been known to help themselves to their kid’s Halloween candy, but new research showing how long it takes to burn off those calories may have them thinking twice.

  • Oct 31

    US Vaping Illnesses Rise to 1,888 With Pace Picking Up Again

    The number of U.S. vaping illnesses has jumped again, reaching more than 1,800 cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 1,888 confirmed and probable cases have been reported in 49 states. An Illinois report brings the toll to 38 deaths in 24 states. The total is 284 higher than what the government reported last week and a larger

  • Oct 31

    Hearing Concludes in Licensing Case for Missouri’s Last Abortion Clinic

    An administrative hearing to decide whether Missouri can revoke the license for the state’s only abortion clinic concluded Thursday with emotional testimony from a clinic official. The hearing in St. Louis before a commissioner with the Missouri Administrative Hearing Commission was expected to last five days but wrapped up a day early. A ruling isn’t expected until February at the

  • Oct 31

    See Where Fast Food Chains Rank on Using Beef Made With Antibiotics

    Consumer groups give many of the top restaurant chains in the United States failing grades for their policies regarding antibiotics used in their beef supply for burgers and other beef dishes, NBC News reports. The report is the result of a combined effort from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education Fund, the Natural Resources Defense Council, Consumer Reports and

  • Oct 31

    Measles Saps Kids’ Ability to Fight Other Germs

    Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system’s memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings “immune amnesia.” The body can rebuild those defenses — but it could take years. And with measles

  • Oct 31

    Measles Saps Kids’ Ability to Fight Other Germs

    Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system’s memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings “immune amnesia.” The body can rebuild those defenses — but it could take years. And with measles

  • Nov 26

    How Daylight Saving Time Affects Health

    Here’s what science has to say about a twice-yearly ritual affecting nearly 2 billion people worldwide.

  • Dec 5

    How Daylight Saving Time Affects Health

    Here’s what science has to say about a twice-yearly ritual affecting nearly 2 billion people worldwide.

  • Oct 30

    FDA Approves Cheaper Meds for Dogs With Separation Anxiety

    Owners of anxious dogs will soon have a generic option for calming pets with separation anxiety, NBC News reported. On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration announced the approval of clomipramine hydrochloride, a generic for the brand name drug Clomicalm, for dogs ages 6 months and up who have fears or underlying anxiety about being left alone. It is meant

  • Oct 30

    Former Juul Executive Sues Over Retaliation, Claims Company Knowingly Sold Tainted Nicotine Pods

    When e-cigarette market leader Juul removed its popular sweet flavors such as mango and creme from stores last year, co-founder Adam Bowen said publicly the company was willing to take a cut in sales to “do the right thing and prevent underage use.” The conversation at Juul’s San Francisco headquarters, though, was far different.

  • Oct 30

    Former Juul Executive Sues Over Retaliation, Claims Company Knowingly Sold Tainted Nicotine Pods

    When e-cigarette market leader Juul removed its popular sweet flavors such as mango and creme from stores last year, co-founder Adam Bowen said publicly the company was willing to take a cut in sales to “do the right thing and prevent underage use.” The conversation at Juul’s San Francisco headquarters, though, was far different.

  • Oct 29

    Missouri Health Department Tracked Planned Parenthood Patients’ Periods

    Missouri’s health department director on Tuesday said he tracked the menstrual cycles of Planned Parenthood patients as part of an effort to identify what the agency says were “failed abortions” at a St. Louis clinic. Department of Health and Senior Services Director Randall Williams made the revelation during the second day of an administrative hearing to determine whether Missouri’s only

  • Oct 29

    Woman’s Awake Brain Surgery Livestreamed on Facebook

    It was a series of everyday words the patient spoke — butterfly, hello, turtle, 20, banana — that told surgeons and 2,000 onlookers, they were in the right spot. On Tuesday morning, the staff at Methodist Dallas Medical Center livestreamed on Facebook a portion of a so-called awake brain surgery on Jenna Schardt, 25. The operation was to remove a

  • Oct 29

    Anti-Anxiety Med Alprazolam Recalled Due to Possible ‘Foreign Substance’

    Mylan Pharmaceuticals issued a nationwide voluntary recall of one lot of Alprazolam — the generic name for prescription anti-anxiety drug Xanax — tablets due to the potential presence of a foreign substance, the company announced. The recall is being carried out due to the potential presence of an unspecified “foreign substance,” Mylan said in its announcement.

  • Oct 29

    Vaccine Shows Promise for Preventing Active TB Disease

    An experimental vaccine proved 50% effective at preventing latent tuberculosis infection from turning into active disease in a three-year study of adults in Africa. Doctors were encouraged because protection declined only a little after two years, and even a partially effective vaccine would be a big help against TB. The lung disease kills more than a million people a year,

  • Oct 28

    Walgreens to Shutter In-Store Clinics, Add Jenny Craig Sites

    Walgreens will shutter nearly 40% of the clinics in its stores as the drugstore chain cuts costs and shifts to other businesses it believes will draw more people through its doors. The company said Monday that it will close 150 Walgreens-run clinics by the end of the year, but it will keep open more than 200 that are run in

  • Oct 28

    Facebook Will Now Remind You to Get Flu Shots and Medical Checkups

    Facebook is now going to start reminding you when to get a medical checkup. The company is rolling out a tool to remind its users in the U.S., based on demographic factors such as age and gender, to get a screening or health test. The company is making this move, according to Freddy Abnousi, a cardiologist who runs Facebook’s health

  • Oct 25

    As Life-Saving Childhood Cancer Drugs Run Short, Patients and Doctors Face Impossible Choices

    One family experienced first-hand a problem that doctors say is too common and worsening: shortages of childhood cancer drugs. Doctors, meanwhile, find themselves having to ration life-saving drugs.

  • Oct 25

    How Worried Should Parents Be About Heavy Metals in Baby Food?

    If you’re the parent of a baby, a study out last week may have left you nervous about all the food you put in your little one’s mouth. The new report from a consumer advocacy group found that 95 percent of 168 commercial baby foods tested contained toxic heavy metals, including lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium, and one in four

  • Oct 25

    Walmart, CVS, Rite Aid Pull J&J Baby Powder From Shelves After FDA Finds Sub-Trace Levels of Asbestos

    Walmart, CVS Health and Rite Aid are pulling all containers of Johnson & Johnson’s 22-ounce baby powder after the FDA found sub-trace amounts of asbestos, the companies confirmed Thursday. “CVS Pharmacy is complying with Johnson & Johnson’s voluntary recall of Johnson’s Baby Powder 22 oz. and is removing this product from all stores and from CVS.com,” spokesman Mike DeAngelis said

  • Oct 24

    Californian Becomes 1st Black Patient to Receive Full Face Transplant

    A California man became the first black patient — and oldest patient — to receive a full face transplant, Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital said Thursday, after a 16-hour procedure several months ago. Robert Chelsea, 68, of Los Angeles — who suffered burns to over 60% of his body and face after his car was struck by a drunk driver

  • Oct 23

    FDA Wants Stronger Warning on Breast Implants About Risks

    U.S. health officials want women getting breast implants to receive stronger warnings and more details about the possible risks and complications. The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that manufacturers should add a warning highlighted by a box — the most serious type — to the information given to women considering implants. The agency is also recommending patients complete a

  • Oct 23

    Pregnant Woman Who Endured Chemo Gives Birth to Healthy Baby

    Just a couple of months after Jade Devis found out she was pregnant, a protruding bump appeared on her chest. It was the beginning of an ordeal that forced the first-time mom and her developing fetus to undergo chemotherapy together after Devis was suddenly diagnosed with breast cancer. She did three rounds before giving birth to her son Bradley in

  • Oct 23

    Always to Ax Female Symbol From Sanitary Products Packages in Nod to Trans Users

    Always announced it will remove the Venus symbol from its menstruation products packaging following calls by transgender advocates, who said its parent, Procter & Gamble, was alienating trans and gender-nonconforming customers by not acknowledging that they, too, can experience menstruation. “Could someone from Always tell me why it is imperative to have the female symbol on their sanitary products?” Twitter

  • Oct 23

    FDA Approves Drug That Could Treat 90% of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday that it has approved the first drug combination to treat most cystic fibrosis patients. Boston-based company Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc. created Trikafta, which combined three drugs in one. Trikafta has been approved for those aged 12 and older with at least one F508del mutation, which affects 90%, or 27,000 patients, with the lung

  • Oct 23

    Disneyland Visitor Might Have Exposed Others to Measles

    A Disneyland visitor might have exposed others to measles earlier this month at the Anaheim theme park, according to the Los Angeles County Public Health Department.

  • Oct 23

    Sneaky Sugars: Which Foods Have the Most Hidden Sweet Stuff?

    If you’ve been cutting back on soda, cakes, cookies and candy to trim your daily sugar intake, you’re off to a good start. But it’s the small amounts of added sugars found in many of the foods we eat regularly that can keep your sugar intake much higher than you think. And many processed foods containing added sugars don’t even

  • Oct 21

    Drugmakers, Distributors Reach 11th-Hour Deal to Settle Opioids Lawsuit

    The nation’s three biggest drug distributors and a major drugmaker agreed to an 11th-hour, $260 million settlement Monday over the terrible toll taken by opioids in two Ohio counties, averting the first federal trial over the crisis. The trial, involving Cleveland’s Cuyahoga County and Akron’s Summit County, was seen as a critical test case that could have gauged the strength

  • Oct 21

    USDA Recalls Sausage Patties Manufactured in Tennessee for Salmonella Risk

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture says more than 6,000 pounds of frozen sausage patties manufactured in Tennessee have been recalled over concerns they may be contaminated with salmonella. A Food Safety and Inspection Service statement released Friday says the ready-to-eat pork and turkey sausage products were made by George’s Prepared Food in Caryville, Tennessee.

  • Oct 20

    Amazon Is Shipping Expired Food, From Baby Formula to Old Beef Jerky, Scaring Consumers and Putting Big Brands at Risk

    Amazon’s sprawling marketplace, consisting of millions of third-party sellers, has become a go-to site for many grocery shoppers, especially since the company’s acquisition of Whole Foods over two years ago. But an increasing number of consumers are finding that, just as the broader Amazon Marketplace has a major issue with counterfeits and unsafe products, the grocery section is littered with

  • Oct 20

    4th Legionnaires’ Disease Death Reported in North Carolina

    North Carolina health officials say a fourth person has died from Legionnaires’ disease. The N.C. Department of Health and Human Resources said in a statement on Friday that its Division of Public Health has confirmed 141 cases involving residents from counties and multiple states. In addition to the deaths, 94 people were hospitalized. Information gathered by local health officials showed

  • Oct 20

    Where You Die Can Affect Your Chance of Being an Organ Donor

    One man’s case illustrates troubling uncertainty in a transplant system run by government contractors that are under fire for letting potentially usable organs go to waste. The Associated Press took a close look at that system and calculated that some of those agencies are securing deceased donors at half the rate of others — even as 113,000 people linger on

  • Oct 19

    As the Lab-Grown Meat Industry Grows, Scientists Debate If It Could Exacerbate Climate Change

    Companies across the world are moving quickly to bring to the market hamburgers and other meat products that are grown from animal cells in a lab. This month, Israeli-based company Future Meat Technologies raised $14 million to build a production plant for its cultured meat products, joining several dozen other start-ups poised to launch their first commercial products within the

  • Oct 19

    Opioid Negotiations Fail to Produce Deal Just Before Trial

    Negotiations aimed at reaching a major settlement in the nation’s opioid litigation reached an impasse Friday. Key differences were between state attorneys general and lawyers representing local governments, rather than with the drugmakers and distributors they are suing. One of the negotiators, North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein, said late Friday that local governments did not accept a deal worth

  • Oct 18

    Heartburn Drug Recall Expands as Sanofi Recalls Brand-Name Zantac OTC

    Drugmaker Sanofi announced on Friday a voluntary recall of the heartburn drug Zantac from all stores in the United States and Canada amid investigations into the presence of a carcinogen discovered in the drug. Sanofi’s steps follow an investigation by U.S. and European regulators into the presence of low levels of the impurity N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in ranitidine, the generic name

  • Oct 18

    Some Johnson’s Baby Powder Recalled After Positive Asbestos Test

    Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. said it was voluntarily recalling a single lot of its Johnson’s Baby Powder in response to a federal test indicating the presence of “sub-trace” levels of asbestos, the company said in a statement Friday.

  • Oct 17

    95 Percent of Baby Foods Tested Contain Toxic Metals: Report

    There’s a strong chance your baby’s food contains traces of toxic heavy metals, including arsenic and lead, according to a new study. The research, commissioned by Healthy Babies Bright Futures (HBBF) and outlined in a report released Thursday, tested 168 baby foods for the presence of four heavy metals: arsenic, lead, mercury and cadmium, NBC news reported.Get more at Read

  • Oct 17

    Border Patrol’s Growing Presence at Hospitals Creates Fear

    An armed Border Patrol agent roamed the hallways of an emergency room in Miami on a recent day as nurses wheeled stretchers and medical carts through the hospital and families waited for physicians to treat their loved ones. The agent in the olive-green uniform freely stepped in and out of the room where a woman was taken by ambulance after

  • Oct 17

    This Viral Photo Reminds Us All How Hard Labor and Delivery Nurses Work

    As a labor and delivery nurse, Caty Nixon cares for families in joy and sorrow. “The good times are so good, and the bad times are heartbreaking,” Nixon, from Forney, Texas, told TODAY. “I’m here for all of it.” Last summer, Nixon ended a 53-hour, four-day workweek by delivering a stillborn baby. The 29-year-old kept it together until she got

  • Oct 17

    Juul Suspends Sales of All Fruity Flavors Ahead of US Ban

    Juul is immediately suspending sales of it popular fruity e-cigarette flavors ahead of a Trump administration policy that is expected to remove all flavored e-cigarettes from the market, the company announced Thursday. Juul last year stopped selling its flavored e-cigarettes in retail stores amid pressure from the Food and Drug Administration. Customers could only get the flavors — creme, mango,

  • Sep 30

    Rite-Aid, Walgreens Join CVS in Pulling Zantac From Shelves

    Rite-Aid and Walgreens have joined CVS in halting the sales of popular heartburn treatment Zantac and its generic store brand after warnings by U.S. health regulators. It’s the latest precautionary move by retailers and manufacturers after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently warned consumers about a potentially dangerous contaminant in prescription and over-the-counter versions of Zantac.

Contact Us