Springtime in the City

Things are popping up in San Francisco.

66 photos
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Keeyla Meadows from Albany, CA designed this garden called "Habitat Dance with a Red-Headed Snake" in the shape of a woman laying down. This view is of her right side.
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Josh Keppel
The San Francisco Flower and Garden Show celebrates 25 years this week with new owners and management as well as an offer for unlimited admission to the show with the purchase of one adult ticket ($20).
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Keeyla Meadows from Albany, CA designed this garden called "Habitat Dance with a Red-Headed Snake" in the shape of a woman laying down. This view is of her right side.
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Garden Designer Keeyla Meadows holds up her new book Fearless Color Gardens: The Creative Gardener's Guide to Jumping Off the Color Wheel.
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Josh Keppel
A look at the "head" of the garden.
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Josh Keppel
"The Living Room" (aka. Alien Jewel Box) was designed by the Organic Mechanics from San Francisco. They describe it as "A whimsical extravagant picturesque building erected to suit a fanciful taste."
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Josh Keppel
James Pettigrew (left) and Sean Stout hang at the entry of their creation chatting and answering questions with friends and show guests. This is their 8th year in the show after 2 years off.
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Josh Keppel
A look inside the cube... Designer Sean Stout said the Garden Show is "a great way to release your creativity and do something you couldn't do in someone's backyard."
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AP
Builder Stephen Hosford from Structural Concepts peaks from behind the opening of the room. Hosford found the driftwood entryway on a beach in Mendocino, CA and cut it in half to install in the piece.
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Josh Keppel
The cube, surrounded by a pool of water with walls made entirely of succulents, seemed to be a crowd favorite.
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Josh Keppel
Dawn Engel designed the Salvaged Creole Jazz garden that was awarded the medal from the California Association of Nurseries and Garden Centers as well as the San Francisco Botanical Garden Society Award.
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Diane
The entryway and gate had cool bent rebar with southern musical influences, like these trumpets above a lobster.
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Josh Keppel
A treble clef sits at the edge of the garden with music notes streaming down the gate made out of bent rebar.
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Josh Keppel
A fun fountain filled with succulents sits in the middle of the courtyard and with alligator (or is it crocodile?) heads drooling sedum succulents.
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AP
Ah Sam Design created Celebrating the Four Seasons, a garden that was sectioned off in four with each season getting its due.
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Josh Keppel
A look at one of the flower arrangements in the garden.
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Mary Te Selle used 100 year old olive trees in her garden Twice Upon a Treehouse: A Modern Fairy Tale.
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Pedro Leal/NBC10.com
A little boy looks down into the pool of water below the treehouse.
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Josh Keppel
Papillon Pad was designed by Andrea Hurd and Liz Tiley and it won the Sunset Magazine Western Living Award.
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Troy Bodolus
The Papillon Pad is dedicated to the widespread re-establishment of four rare butterfly species: the Mission Blue, San Bruno Elfin, Bay Checkerspot, and Callippe Silverspot.
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Josh Keppel
Garden Creator Gary Gragg turned his longboard skateboard into a makeshift scooter to help him get around on Thursday, a few weeks after having split his Achilles. He dumpster dove some wood "ski poles" and said the "Garden Show is all about adapting."
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Prehistoric Paradise was designed by Benjamin Goulart...
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Josh Keppel
...complete with waterfall, bubbling volcano, and a peeping tom dinosaur.
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Josh Keppel
Here's a closeup of the prehistoric waterfall.
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Josh Keppel
"Tempo di Tempo" (All in Good Time) was designed by Rick Martens and Brian Forseth.
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Josh Keppel
Native Garden 3.0 was designed by San Franciscan Brian Swope, who "moonlights" as a pediatrician 4-days-a-week in the East Bay.
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Josh Keppel
"Nature existing in harmony with modern society: this garden is actually a living system that sustains native fauna while requiring minimal care, no chemicals, and little water."
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Josh Keppel
Frank Valle (left) the contractor on the project was talking with Swope (right) about the expense of doing the Garden Show. They estimate the garden cost $15,000 for the material and labor (their time not included), with lots of things donated. While it is very expensive for a 5-day display, they said "This is the only time that we can be ourselves."
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Re-Generation "the World without Us" was designed by Richard Radford & Sandy Ayers.
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AP
Ayers and Radford won the Golden Cup for their first trip to the SF Flower and Garden Show, as well as a medal from The Garden Conservancy.
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"Our installation represents the forces at play in our natural world. The landscape symbolically portrays a design space overwhelmed by the elements, yet stands as monument to sustainable design/build methods of the 21st century."
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NBC Bay Area
The stainless steel armadillo sculpture doubles as a BBQ! The designers told me the garden was fabricated 100% off the grid with solar energy.
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NBC Bay Area
Cooling the Heat Island was designed by Daniel Owens and Cathy Riordan.
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NBC 6 South Florida
At least half of the gardens in the show had water features including this rectangular pool with a constant drizzle from above.
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Josh Keppel
A few of the gardens even had koi ponds with live fish swimming around.
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Josh Keppel
A company specializing in water features called Ripple Effect Water Gardens from Redwood City, CA created the Nature by Design garden.
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Josh Keppel
A waterfall into the koi pond looked like it was right out of the natural world.
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Josh Keppel
Next to that garden was another garden with a large water feature, but done in a totally different way. Via Aqua was designed by Joseph Huetti.
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Laura Schaub, former garden show participant and current PR person for the show, said "These are two of my favorites with one done in a naturalist way with a contractor who makes water features [Nature by Design] and the other done by a landscape architect using [water] in a modern way."
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Josh Keppel
The Urban Oasis was designed by Arthur Brito, Arborealis. "The concept of the outdoor room gives us the opportunity to create our personal place. It is a place where we can leave behind the flashy, the loud, and the glimmering. Here we find the tranquil and well-worn comforts of our retreat, created in a contained urban setting."
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Josh Keppel
I really liked this cool arch of streaming water with lit rocks and a waterfall into a koi pond.
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Josh Keppel
A look at the end of the stream with waterfall and koi pond.
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Josh Keppel
Sunset Ambiance was designed by Thomas Scherer. "This garden celebrates the pleasures of a sumptuous sun lit day fading into glowing twilight. The garden blends free flowering trees, shrubs and vines with inviting stone veneer architecture."
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Sunset Ambiance won the California Landscape Contractor's Association Award.
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Josh Keppel
A peak at the grill between the columns inside Sunset Ambiance.
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NBC 6 South Florida
Designer Regina Rollin stands at the bottom of the water collection tower in her garden No Place Like Home.
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Josh Keppel
"This garden strikes a balance between Oz and Auntie Em's backyard. It features recycled materials and plants with moderate to low water needs for climate zones 8 & 9. The garden has a lush look and sense of fun with modern simplicity."
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Josh Keppel
A table for two sits inside the water tower structure.
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NBC 6 South Florida
A movable chicken coop with live chickens was incorporated into the garden. Laura Schaub said, "One of the chickens laid an egg right on cue as the ladies from Sunset Magazine were looking over the garden." We're not in Kansas anymore...
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Josh Keppel
Jason Hamon designed the garden Essential Elements - A Sanctuary for the Soul, complete with hot tub and bridge pathway.
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A Sustainable / Artistic / Multicultural / Edible / Retreat was designed by Annette and Mike Heacox from Sacramento, CA.
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A Sustainable / Artistic / Multicultural / Edible / Retreat has a nice sitting area in the corner beneath the palms and bamboo.
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AFP/Getty Images
One of the coolest things I saw, was this Sun Curve by Inka out of Half Moon Bay. The Sun Curve is a "closed loop vertical aquaponic micro farm powered by solar panels, a wind turbine, and a battery pack." The system "grows plants vertically using the water from the fish pond as a reservoir and nutrient source."
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Josh Keppel
Inka co-founder Paul Giacomantonio said his systems are like a "giant Chia pet" where edible food can be grown vertically on his 1-inch thick fabric.
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Josh Keppel
Some schools in San Francisco are getting these installed to help elementary students get a hands on way of learning about food, power and sustainability.
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Bloomberg via Getty Images
For more information on the Inka Biospheric Systems, check their website: http://www.inka.fm
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Josh Keppel
Outside in the breezeway between two buildings, vendors set up where last year food was being served.
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The building next to the main hall was filled with vendors selling anything and everything to keep your garden looking good.
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Josh Keppel
A wide variety of tomato plants were flying off the shelves at Love Apple Farm.
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Josh Keppel
Allyn Adcock worked the Big Island Plants booth handing out plumeria samples and selling starters for $15 and cuttings for $10.
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Josh Keppel
Behind the second hall was "Slow Food Plaza" where food vendors have teamed up with local farmers to provide fresh food along side corn dogs. This area was empty last year, and now art is on display as well as the food.
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Josh Keppel
Under a big white tent in the middle of the lawn sat an edible victory garden with compost, chickens and food.
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Josh Keppel
Obama's White House garden was an inspiration for the SF Flower and Garden show creating a Victory Garden honoring and bringing that tradition to the West Coast.
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AFP/Getty Images
Miriam Goldberger came to the show from Ontario, Canada to sell her low maintenance, drought tolerant lawn called Eco-Lawn.
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AP
The Eco-Lawn uses 75% less water and has roots that go 9-14 inches deep. This is the first sustainable lawn I've heard of that isn't fake.
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Josh Keppel
Other vendors sold sculptures, furniture and plants outside. For more information on the SF Flower and Garden show, check their site http://www.sfgardenshow.com/
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