ABOUT MOLLY'S JOURNEY

NBC Bay Area follows Molly Golbon through her successes and struggles living with lung cancer. Similar to about 20 percent of lung cancer patients, Molly is not a smoker. She tested positive for a gene mutation called EGFR, which doctors say is a driving force behind her lung cancer. This gene mutation means Molly does not get treated with chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery, at least not yet. Instead, she takes one pill a day, called Tarceva. So far it's working.
>> READ OUR ORIGINAL REPORT

 

RESOURCES

Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation
Through empowering and educating patients, funding cutting-edge research, building strategic collaborations and raising public awareness, their goal is to transform lung cancer into a chronically managed disease within 10 years and ultimately to find a cure.

Lungevity Advocates
LUNGevity Foundation is firmly committed to making an immediate impact on increasing quality-of-life and survivorship of people with lung cancer by accelerating research into early detection and more effective treatments, as well as providing community, support and education for all those affected by the disease.




            

DECEMBER 2014 UPDATE

Watch the NBC Bay Area News documentary, "Molly's Journey," that aired on Nov. 29, 2014.
>> WATCH HERE

 

 

 

SEPTEMBER 2014 UPDATE

Molly's journey, as seen during the 2014 Stand Up To Cancer telecast.
>> WATCH HERE

 

 

JUNE 2014 UPDATE

“Here’s the thing, when a family member gets cancer, it’s not just the patient. We all have cancer." Molly's husband, Arash Golbon, shares his perspective of supporting his wife through her success and struggles.
>> READ MORE & WATCH INTERVIEW




MAY 2014 UPDATE

When you live with stage IV lung cancer, testing days are big, but you wouldn’t be able to tell from Molly Golbon’s face. With a smile on her face, she walked into get her latest CT scan to see if her cancer had shrunk, grown, or remained the same. The test itself only took a couple of minutes, but then Molly and her husband Arash had to wait a couple of hours to get the results.  On this day, the results were good. The scans showed the main mass in her lung is much smaller in size. >> READ MORE















APRIL 2014 ORIGINAL REPORT

Molly Golbon doesn't take much for granted these days. The 39-year old married working mom of two knows life can take unexpected turns. For her, it came with a pain in her throat, tiredness, and a cough that wouldn't go away.

"I went in for an MRI, and that's when they found there was something on the MRI," Golbon recalled. That something turned out to be lung cancer. "I think when they told me it was lung cancer, I thought it can't be. It can't be. It's probably bronchitis or pneumonia, it's not that."

Unfortunately, it was. Until her diagnosis, Golbon, like many people, thought only smokers got lung cancer.

>> CONTINUE READING & WATCH REPORT